Archive for the ‘blogging’ Category

I’m back! (A Quick-Start Guide to DaveX)

November 16, 2015

Sorry for the gigantic delay. My last post of merit was written one year, six months, and nine days ago! To say that things have been a little rough is an understatement. Since that time, I have graduated from university, accepted a full-time position managing a community radio station, and gotten divorced. I’ve had more than a few close encounters with my depression, and have been just about as low (off and on) as I ever hope I’ll get. I’ve assured myself that it’s a terribly boring story, so I’m going to quickly skip you to the present with a handy “quick-start” guide:

I’m DaveX. I’ve been interested in sound for as long as I can remember, but I didn’t always know it. I’ve hosted numerous radio programs featuring experimental music, each with a focus on active listening. I have two children, “Mo” and “The Weasel.” I manage a small community radio station that is not unlike running The Muppet Show. I have problems with depression, but I’m still hopeful. I enjoy collecting records and tapes, reading, and circuit-bending. I make noisy things (and sometimes, I sell them!) I’m a vegetarian. I like comic books, photobooths, and kung-fu movies. Dee Snider saved my life, and I will happily read your John Cage fan-fiction.

This week, I’m on vacation from work, so I’m going to be getting back into blogging. To kick things off, I’ve uploaded my latest episode of “Music For Swimmers” to SoundCloud. You can listen to it online, or download the files. Ordinarily, this is a one-hour program, but Mo was sick today, so it’s closer to 2 hours and 15 minutes. The playlist is below– enjoy!

“Music For Swimmers” 11/15/15

Brian Chase “Feedback Drone” on Pogus Productions
Ross Bolleter “Piano Dreaming” on Pogus
Enzo Minarelli “The Weak Suits” on Pogus
RP Collier “Scum For DaveX” on RP Collier
Richard Pinhas “Efrim” on Cuneiform Records
Tony Youngblood “Light Has A Universal Meaning”
Tony Youngblood “Moderate Stimulation”
Tri Atma “Natural Loving” on Higher Octave Music
Tony Youngblood “Different Voices, Different Worlds”
Preston Ari Swirnoff “Maariv 1” on Last Visible Dog
César Bolaños “Sialoecibi, ESEPCO I” on Pogus
John Lennon, Yoko Ono “Two Virgins No. 1” on Negram
Leif Elggren “Soya” on Bananafish
OiMa “Brushman” on OiMa
OiMa “Prayer Wheel” on OiMa
Mooey Moobau “Love Bloody Love Food Sewer Food” on vosotros
Alok “Pool Weakness” on Lona Records
Oval “Standard Audio Frontend” on Thrill Jockey Records
Kiyoshi Mizutani, Hideaki Shimada & Kiyoharu Kuwayama “Chimere 1” on Monochrome Vision
Martin Denny “Quiet Village” on EMI Capitol
The Evolution Control Committee “hello” on Seeland
Steamboat Switzerland “VI” on Grob
Anaphylaxis “all yours” on Parasomnic Records/Mannequin Oddio
Pitz “Motet 6” on Oktadka
Pitz “Motet 7” on Oktadka
Anders Ostberg “Futuristic Experimental Music” on Chain Tape Collective
Chica X “Kickin The Kittens” on Nail In The Coffin
George Korein and the Spleen “There Must Be Somewhere” on George Korein
Tuft “Bathory” on Medusa Head Records
John Morton “Amazing Grace Variations” on Innova
Marcelo Radulovich “Turn On the Phone” on Titicacaman Records
Kanito “3” on NoType
Celluloid Mata “Convex” on ant-zen
Electropolis “Sailing The Flat Earth” on Innova
@c “77(1)” on Monochrome Vision
Kid Koala “Drunk Trumpet” on Ninja Tune
Tom Nunn “Skatchmat” on Edgetone Records
Matt Weston “Holler” on 7272music
Juppala Kaapio “Kagami Hebi (Mirror Snake)” on Last Visible Dog
Massimo Falascone & Bob Marsh “In Your Dreams” on Eh?
Loachfillet “Hell” on Resipiscent
Uladat “Guerra” on Black Tropical Records
Noah Creshevsky & If, Bwana “Cicada #4: Version Barnard” on Pogus Productions
Kenneth Gaburo “For Harry” on Pogus
Z’ev & Bob Bellerue “Felt, If Not Seen” on Phage Tapes

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Drop what you’re doing, come with me for a sec.

November 13, 2011

I updated my “More DaveX around the net” section, which is of the utmost importance, of course. Also, here is a photo I took just moment ago:

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November 14, 2010

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The Blogapus is ALIVE!

September 13, 2010

WDBX-FM’s new blog, “The Blogapus” is up now– you should check it out! I’m really proud to be helping get it off the ground, and get WDBX a stronger cooperative presence online.

Did you notice?

April 6, 2010

I’m doing some housecleaning here at STARTLING MONIKER– in the right-hand column, I’ve included a dedicated link to each of my radio broadcasts under the “Pages” heading. You will find the most current playlist for each show here, as well as submissions information and show times. I’m also proudly sporting the brand-new “Sounds Like Radio” logo at its link. WSIU design assistant and former Cat In the Hat Melody Henkelmann’s update on my long-time mascot Malty sure looks great!

~ORE~ History, pt.2

December 18, 2009

If you’ve been reading my blog for any length of time, you’ll know that my first radio show was ~ORE~, which I co-hosted for two years with Tony Youngblood. Lately, I’ve been exploring the history of WDBX-FM, but Tony’s most THEATRE INTANGIBLE entry got me thinking about digging back into the history of ~ORE~. You’ll want to read the sister entry (fact: like ships, all blogs are female) before continuing here.

I’ve been with ~ORE~ in one fashion or another since it got started, at Southern Illinois University’s WIDB radio in 1998. By that time, I was a confirmed music obsessive, but I had yet to do anything with radio. Tony’s on-air collages caught my ear, and I started helping him compile raw material each week, which we would sift through during the live broadcasts. More often than not, the results were something of a trainwreck– but I gradually began to realize that I was building my listening skills, learning to improvise in a sound environment, and getting a serious education in composition as well. In effect, ~ORE~ was like experimental music bootcamp. The grind of producing a new episode each week with zero budget, amidst a full college workload was often intense. But ~ORE~ opened my mind to the possibilities of radio and music in ways that I hadn’t thought possible. I distinctly remember pitching one show idea to Tony that would take place entirely in engineering, re-routing cables and signals to see what would happen to the broadcast signal. Although we didn’t ever go through with this (admittedly rather hazardous) idea, the concept of multi-layered improvisation existing at all levels of the radio chain stuck with me– we could alter the music, we could alter the broadcast, we could alter the radios receiving it, we could alter the listeners… and they could alter us. The possibilities were simply staggering.

Tony and I had apparently soaked up Wu-Tang Clan’s greatest lesson, too– make it a franchise. Thus, the original ~ORE~ was endowed with “Prefab Audio Extrapolations” as a tagline. Even while fighting to keep up with a one-hour weekly broadcast, we were thinking of the future! At times, it seemed like anyone who was listening was actually AT the broadcasts, or helping make them. Although we were doing something amazingly different on the SIU campus, we didn’t exist in a bubble. Flyers and chalk were our outreach. Wednesday nights, we’d gather under the dim yellow lights of Faner Hall, and begin our amazingly huge chalk runs. We got our friends and family into it with us, making teams to cover as much of the 900-foot length of the breezeway as possible before the chalk bucket ran out. By morning, Faner was a pastel mess of dogs and cows spouting absurdist essays extolling the virtues of experimental radio, mixed with the inevitable Xeroxed flyers cooked up special for the occasion. Although the flyers rarely made much sense, we knew that they would reach others like us– weirdos, makers, noise-enthusiasts, record collector scum, freaks… our people.

When Tony graduated, I tried to carry on with ~ORE~ as best as I could. Now having found myself in the somewhat ironic position of being a more senior member of WIDB (I found this funny, because I had never officially joined), I made some effort to have a positive effect on the greater course of the station. But WIDB was floundering and directionless– and worse yet, it was splitting into two “factions”. On one side, WIDB had a core group of specialty-show DJs and music fans who were happy to continue WIDB’s long tradition of broadcasting in an oddball college radio format. They recognized that the freedom we were allowed for selecting our music brought with it a responsibility to showcase recordings and artists outside the mainstream, something that a commercial station cannot often do. On the other side, there were those who wished to emulate these same commercial stations, rendering WIDB little more than a warm-up “practice” space for those seeking jobs in corporate broadcasting. Worse yet, they wanted to cede more and more time to the automated programming, and were removing the specialty shows one by one.

The climate was rough, to say the least. WIDB had re-branded itself as “The Revolution,” an insipid and hollow slogan ironically describing whole days filled with nothing but a computer playing mp3 files in the back room for the bored, captive audience in the Student Center. I took to showing up at random times, shutting the PC off, and broadcasting miniature shows for anyone who would listen. Other DJs also stepped up to the plate– I heard others interrupting the automation as well, discussing the change over the air, or refusing to play the nonsense dictated by new programming rules.

But eventually, it got to be too much. I was tired, and ~ORE~ was beaten. I’d seen the new programming schedule, which literally crowned the station manager victorious by awarding him my old time slot. It reduced specialty shows by more than half, pushing them entirely to the weekends. The “Quiet Storm” broadcasting, which was arguably our most popular offering, was slashed dramatically. This was bizarro-world WIDB, and I wanted no part of it. On the night of the last ~ORE~ broadcast, the senior staff of WIDB was taking part in a pep rally on campus, attempting to out-shout other student organizations to show their spirit. I couldn’t think of a more fitting end to my days with the station– playing my favorite tunes to a dark student union, while the staff screamed about how amazing we were. After my last record was over, I posted some flyers to announce the occasion… and ~ORE~ Prefab Audio Extrapolations was dead.

Here’s some early flyer art for ~ORE~, and a bunch of other photos besides. I’ll do my best to explain them:

This was the core of the ~ORE~ family. I always liked this flyer, and felt that it represented us all well. Our “Mysterious DJ” was Will Bernel, AKA DJ Shad, AKA Willie Dynamite. I owe him a lot as a fellow DJ, and would love to chat with him again sometime!

This flyer is one of our “stealth” postings. Our flyers were often torn down by a campus Christian group, so I’d try to hide them in plain view for longer shelf life.

I love this one– “who gives a shit about our soundless room?!” Be sure to click these to see them large, okay?

On the surface, this one makes no sense whatsoever. In actuality, it describes the exact plot of “Doug’s Party,” our most infamous episode.

I re-worked the dialogue in this flyer many, many times, even employing it later at WDBX-FM.

I made this flyer in January of 1999, long before Franz Ferdinand would rip me off, lol.

Open these windows in a new tab– here, heeere, and heeeeeeeere— to see more of my flyer art!

Here’s Matty Smith, the station manager who was intent on turning WIDB into a total shitpile. As you can see, he was a complete tool. I got him to pose with a sign that had been posted at WIDB since I arrived, allowing me to subtly alter the content for greater veracity. Also present– a very young DJ Mo!

Here was Matty’s proposed schedule. See all the “pre-programmed” stuff? YIKES!

Long Live ~ORE~

I’ve got to imagine that WIDB is a different place now. New DJs, new ideas, and a couple solid webstreams have seen to that. Do yourself a favor and check them out— tell them DaveX said “hi”.

Theatre Intangible website goes live

December 14, 2009

My former ~Ore~ co-host Tony Youngblood has gone live with his THEATRE INTANGIBLE website, which will features downloads of ~Ore~ recordings and news about Nashville’s emerging avant-garde arts community. I have a long history with ~Ore~ so I’m naturally excited to see it finally have a place on the net– go check it out this afternoon. If you happen to be in the Nashville area, be sure to leave Tony a comment, too.

Startling Moniker back from mind excursion

December 1, 2009

In the past, one of my goals at STARTLING MONIKER was to write a mid-sized music review each day. This didn’t work out well for me; it was tiresome, difficult, and simply could not keep pace with submissions. It’s hard to keep one’s sense of accomplishment from turning into a mixture of guilt and dread in such circumstances. That’s why I’m changing things up, starting today.

First off, I’ll be featuring a lot more reviews on STARTLING MONIKER. They’ll be quite a bit shorter, and more immediately focused on the things I find interesting in the recording. Finding out about new music is a lot of fun for me, so I want to share that discovery process with you. Alongside quick, daily reviews of new music, I’ll be working in older material for reviews as well. You’ll notice that the older recordings are often linked in some way to the more current ones being featured– being a good listener doesn’t necessarily mean keeping up with every new release, but it does often mean re-visiting past recordings armed with new knowledge. Hopefully, I’ll be able to help with that.

You’re also going to start seeing a lot more netlabel and creative commons action. Previously, I’ve avoided reviewing freely-available recordings because I believed that listeners were assuming no risk in simply trying them out. While I still encourage all listeners to jump in on their own, I’ve neglected the fact that it’s a big freakin’ ocean of sound out there. I see our musical future as being an amalgamation of physical labels, netlabels, creative commons endeavors, boutique cassette runs, p2p, blogs, and any number of unimaginable things yet to come– there’s usefulness in starting to map it out.

Of course, I’ll be continuing to do my weekly liveblogged broadcast entries for each episode of “It’s Too Damn Early.” With a bit of luck, I’ll be able to get the recording/download situation for past episodes worked out as well! WDBX’s new stream could help this immensely, so keep your fingers crossed!

Dear DaveX, what’s new with you?

October 26, 2009

I’ve got a few different entries worth of stuff to share with you all, but I’m going to try cramming it all into one post.

To begin with, the first Mystery Tapes are now in the wild. Some of these will be much easier to find than others, as I have been taking my usual absurdist approach to placing them. I nearly put #3 under a few dozen tons of concrete I watched being poured the other day… the paleontological ramifications of this were exciting, but even I had a hard time picturing anyone actually finding the tape in the future. Keep an eye out, and maybe you’ll find one!

I’m also working hard on my upcoming performance of John Cage and Lejaren Hiller’s “KNOBS” composition. This will be the world-premiere performance of the piece, so I’m taking it very seriously, and hoping to do a great job with it. The premiere will be helping to kick off the three-day “All Together Now” inter-arts festival at SIUC’s Student Center. I really hope that all my local readers can make some time on the evening of November 18th to come down to the Student Center Auditorium and check it out. It’s at 7:30, and will be free. Bring your kids, your friends, and your friends’ kids.

Getting ready for the performance has been interesting so far. I’ve never worked this in-depth with an actual score, so this is a new experience for me. The score is very precise, so I’ve been developing a method for keeping exact time during the performance, as everything occurs in five-second intervals. Making matters more complex is the addition of a troupe of modern dancers to the mix. Normally I’d avoid this sort of thing, but I think it’s in the spirit of the festival itself (which is a cooperative and improvisational event) and with John Cage, whose life-long partnership with Merce Cunningham often resulted in such collaborations.

At the same time, I’m literally “gearing up” for teaching a circuit bending workshop on the second day of the festival. The Create-A-Smile Thrift Shop was nice enough to donate a good amount of electronic toys for me to work on, so there will be more than enough interesting possibilities presenting themselves throughout the workshop. If you’ve got any interest in circuit bending, this is a free chance for you to give it a shot– just get up to the Student Center “E” Ballroom on November 19th in the evening time and check it out.

WDBX is having trouble AGAIN with the webstream, it’s just not working for Mac users. I talked with Brian about it, who assures me that he’s trying to find a new host for our stream– if you know someone reliable and technically-proficient who is not a total dumbf**k, not the sort of person who will let our stream be down every other day or encode it in a Microsoft-user-only format, or insist that 64kbps sounds great, please put them in touch with us. That would be AWESOME.

Finally, I’m pushing the re-vamp of STARTLING MONIKER back a bit to December. Getting back to reviewing music is a goal of mine, but I’ve got a couple health-related goals that are going to need to be accomplished before I feel good about dedicating more time to sit at the computer. Winter is coming, and with it, my usual sense of dread and depression. I’m going to see if I can get ahead of it this time around, so bear with me. In the meantime, keep listening, keep commenting, and keep your head up. –DaveX

Tabs Out

March 27, 2009

I’m always up for another noise review blog, especially one that’s as funny as this:

“Random length tapes are one of those things that gets to me (recycled tapes excluded). When you release a C30, dub those mother fuckers on C30s. Don’t just have a random mixture of C30s and C41s and C62s and C33s, etc… You see that a lot with Fag Tapes. I imagine Heath just has this huge cardboard box in his house filled with tapes. It’s a good size box – about the size you would use it to ship a three year old in – probably with phone numbers and doodles of dicks scrawled on the sides. Packed to the brim with everything from C1s to C120s, some spray painted, some not. I can imagine the dude just picking in like a cookie jar, dubbing with one hand, hitting a Bart Simpson shaped bong with the other. It’s actually a pretty inspiring vision when you think about it, but the end game is gonna be mega-gaps. I HATE super long gaps at the end of sides. You ever forget you were listening to a tape because there is so much blank space at the end? I’ve definitely been in the situation of pumping silence out of the speakers for a good 15 – 20 minutes before thinking “wasn’t I listening to something”, then the play button pops up and I jump a bit.”

via Tabs Out.

“Vietnam” flyer controversy, pt.3

January 25, 2009

The ongoing, unthinking controversy concerning the now-infamous “Vietnam” flyer continued to rage today, reaching a greater percentage of the public than analysts had previously thought possible. In what pundits are calling “a classic example of the media watchdog asleep at the gates,” the New York Times mistakenly selected the late-night blog ramblings of community radio volunteer DaveX as serious commentary on Vietnam. As early as today, WordPress statistics show an influx of visitors to the New York Times website have followed the link– unwittingly introducing themselves to the world of underground music, severed cow head photography, and John Cage fanfic.

It is not yet known at this time how much of the global population will be exposed to STARTLING MONIKER, but it has been suggested that anonymous Carbondale citizens are making every effort to contain the leak.

“We’ve asked him to crawl back to his cave, where he belongs,” said Carter Frederick from besides his hobo campfire. “I could give two shits about a hack radio show in the middle of the night.”

Another resident, who asked reporters to remain nameless, told reporters he was jealous of the enjoyment his pets took from listening to DaveX’s broadcasts.

“I told him to take his art to a local shelter,” he said, wiping tears from his eyes. “He should change the title to ‘Music Only Dogs Can Hear’.”

For now, DaveX is content to let the controversy run its course. “It’s ironic,” he said. “Those who want most for me to just disappear seem to do the greatest job of promoting everything I do!”

(VIEW THIS IN FULL SIZE)

nytwtf

Startling Moniker’s Top 12 Best Happy Neat-O List of 2008!

January 13, 2009

Yes, it’s mid-January 2009. Let’s just say I’m fashionably late, and leave it at that. Or think of this list as your buying guide– if you’re spending this coming Valentine’s Day alone (perhaps tearfully re-organizing your record shelves?) see to it that you order a bunch of these fantastic releases to cheer you up. Just as last year, I will be treating my inability to count as less of a handicap, and more of a endearing eccentricity. And now, in no particular order, here are the Top 12 13 Best Happy Neat-O List of 2008 winners:

amo_2001) Mooey Moobau — “All Murmur of Our Mothers’ Waters” — Earlier this year, I referred to this disc as “dictio-fuckery,” a term which captures the pure glottological delight of rolling words back and forth on your tongue until all meaning is lost save for the sweet sonority. As a child, I once said the word “question” repeatedly until I couldn’t figure out if I was saying it correctly at all. This could have easily been the accompanying soundtrack.

40782) Eddie the Rat — “Out Behind the 8-ball” — Privately, I think of Eddie the Rat‘s Peter Martin as  a more unruly modern-day version of Harry Partch. This may not be totally accurate, but hey, it’s my head. Still, what with the brash polyrhythms coaxed from oddball homemade percussion instruments, I may not be too far off. But where Partch carried elements of the American folk landscape back to a greater listening audience, “Out Behind the 8-ball” mines South Asian influences, resulting in something like a post-trepanation Les Baxter album. Lovely!

40773) Jess Rowland — “The Problem With the Soda Machine” — Here’s a weird one for you. Rowland comes across some intra-corporate vending machine related e-mail drama, and decides to set it to music. In less capable hands, a disaster. For Rowland, one of the most immediately loveable albums right out of the box that I heard all year. Order this, and I’ll tell your future as a free gift: you’ll soon find yourself singing “we are faced with a choice about the future of the machines.” (Psst, this disc and #2 are from Edgetone Records. Order them both, and you’ll save on postage!)

frank-rothkamm-just-3-organs4) Rothkamm — “Just 3 Organs” — I used to think that if I had math skills, I would have made Rothkamm music; that’s how much I enjoy what he’s doing. But lately, I realize that nobody can make Rothkamm music but Rothkamm. It’s really the only similarity this list of albums shares– it’s strange stuff, a unique product of a unique mind. Simultaneously sound-obsessed and math-enabled, “Just 3 Organs” visits a series of hyper-organ works upon us. It’s a post-Second Life music, both virtual and yet displaying the umbilicus of its creator. If my ongoing fascination with Rothkamm hasn’t got you to pick one of his releases up yet, now is the time.

5) GX Jupitter-Larsen’s “Zelphabet” Series — Didn’t I say it best already? “Like the RRRecycled tapes, but done with some class, and considerable more attention to quality.” This 27-CD subscription (or buy ’em individually!) series shows why Jupitter-Larsen is the Bruce Schneier of noise– he’s got deep connections, and even deeper knowledge. Each disc is like sitting at the knee of a master, so you better believe they’re worthwhile.

cc_elementalshifta6) Cristopher Cichocki – “Elemental Shift” — This is the kind of release that only comes around once in a blue moon; a perfect artistic statement in its own right, but also able to vividly enhance one’s perception of many other unrelated works. Undoubtedly, this was my favorite release of the year– I couldn’t shutup about it, either– so there’s more of my gushing here and here.

mangler-redbeard7) Warm Climate — “Mangler Redbeard” — Apparently the locus of many LA experimental projects I’m currently enjoying, Warm Climate’s Seth Kasselman recorded “Mangler Redbeard” in a month as part of an online challenge… true evidence of how hard inspiration can strike! Equal parts glam-rock and bizarro-world influence, this ugly little bit of Xerox-and-CDR should not be missed.

tefasimage8) Glenn Weyant — “SonicAnta D-Construction Series” — If you’re looking to develop an ongoing relationship with something truly unexpected, consider subscribing to this series of CDRs. They from full-length explorations with a Honeywell fan; to sonic smorgasbords of homemade instruments, field recordings, and Weyant’s trademark border-fence-and-violin-bow collage. Wild and heady stuff, crafted by someone with a palpable love of sound.

9) George Korein — “Another Corpse” — I can’t seem to nail down exactly when this disc came out, so I’m going to be bold and claim it for 2008. As always, Korein appears to have dropped in from somewhere out in space, content to mystify Earthling listeners with another art-fractured gem. Describing Korein’s music always reminds me of an old Rolling Stone review for Missy Elliot, “She jumps so far off the heezy, she lands right on another heezy.”

10) LX Rudis — “Audible Method 1.43” — I don’t have a lot of info on this one, but I’m still super-excited to hear a live-studio-CDR hybrid disc such as this. Field recordings, live performance, editing, mastering all get mixed up quite thoroughly here. It’s hard for me to make this sound as amazing as it actually is, the mystery of whether you can actually acquire a copy makes it every more fun. Better check with Rudis at his MySpace profile… and while you’re there, dig his blogged bio for fun bits about trying out for tuxedomoon and the Dead Kennedys.

transe_des_mots11) Frederique Bruyas — “La Transe Des Mots” — This is the album that got me thinking, “gee, I really need to learn French.” It’s a one-two punch of bibliophile elan and Diamanda Galas’s swagger, and well worth your time. Bruyas collaborator Pierrejean Gaucher’s dexterous fretwork surprises at all turns.

51tixbrjyxl_sl500_aa240_12) Annea Lockwood — “A Sound Map of the Danube” — A triumph, which all sound enthusiasts should own. Lockwood not only covers the entirety of the Danube in this three-disc hunt for the river’s voice, but features many inhabitants whose daily lives are shaped along its way. This is fascinating listening, perfectly captured in a sumptuous release from the always-worthwhile Lovely Music Limited label.

bnn21_313) Lee Hangjun, Hong Chulki — “Expanded Celluloid, Extended Phonograph” ( 확장된 셀룰로이드, 연장된 포노그래프 ) — An astounding film demonstrating a concept vital to understanding many of the fine releases from Seoul-based Balloon & Needle label, that of “cracks” or “gaps” in media. For Hangjun, this takes the form of not filming anything, but rather choosing to work directly with the film itself. For Chulki, listeners are confronted with the sound of recordless turntables, or of the “meta-record” created by putting two needles to digital time-code vinyl records. It’s a world where sound influences itself, and raw film finds a place in the spotlight, and is definitely a world worth your visit.

A musical meme!

August 26, 2008

Scott, of the Musical Perceptions blog, came up with a fun meme— and since it’s a rarity that I have any reason to participate in these, I’m happy to run into this one via Classical-Drone.

“So I pose the question this way: what musical performance of the 20th century would you most want to either witness or take part in? Imagine performing in the orchestra for the Rite of Spring premiere in 1913, or being in the crowd at Stalag VIII in 1945 for Messiaen’s performance of his Quartet for the End of Time?”

Pretty good answers, I must say. Still, I’d rather go halfsies on Caleb’s time-cab:

“The original staging of Xenakis’ Perseopolis in the ruins of the palace of Darius, at night, played over a hundred loudspeakers spread through the ruins, with fireworks, choreographed torch runners, natural fire, and huge projectors. Kinda sticky politically, but still.

Actually, there were several Stockhausen events to make me yearn for time transport. He played a series of concerts in the caves of Jeita, Lebanon, where he placed 180 speakers among the rocks and played his electronic and intuitive music in the inner dome of the caverns…”

As for me, I know exactly what places I’d hit– first off, John Cage and Lejaren Hiller’s 1969 performance of “HPSCHD;” the simultaneous outpouring of seven harpsichords, multiple tapes of noises, outer space slides, films– all in the University of Illinois Assembly Hall. After this, I’d part ways with Caleb for a few months, and use some of my future money to clear out the record shops (vinyl, baby!) and bide my time until December. Of course, I’d have New Year’s Eve plans… for any Hendrix-phile like myself, the chance to take in all four Fillmore East Band of Gypsies shows is just too tempting.

By this time, I’d have the whole McFly bit down pat, so I’d be ready for travels a bit further back… 1914, to the London Coliseum, for some of Luigi Russolo’s performances with his Intonorumori. Time travel most likely being rather expensive, I’d defray my costs with some minidisc bootlegs, making for a lovely limited-edition boxset to finance the trip upon my return.

Took the words right outta my mouth!

August 19, 2008

Maurice Garland (XXL mag writer, hip-hop blogger @ The Rezidue) laid out what’s been running through my head for the past week or so– something I wasn’t expecting from his blog, by any means.

To continue, simply substitute “noise artist” every time Garland has written “rapper”.

“We need more dentists. We need more doctors. We need more economists. More truck drivers. More chefs. More store owners. I need a teacher for my unborn child. A rapper? No, I don’t need or want another one of those.

Of course, to some, rapping is merely a hobby. Some people paint, some people build model cars, some people rap. Cool. If thats how you pass your time, do your thing and keep it just that a hobby. But as far as more cats trying to “get on” no, please stop the madness.

Its almost as if rapping has become its own language. Its damn near equivalent to speaking English…because everybody does it. Its like rapping is the 6th Sense. Seeing, Hearing, Touching, Tasting, Smelling….Rapping.

I probably should have set if off in there last night now that I think about it. Giving someone a low score probably didn’t contribute to starting the Rapper Cut-Off Line. Hell, that shit probably got interpreted as “hating.” And you know niggas do with their haters! Make them their motivators, cause they on the grind, son!!!!!

From now on, I think I’m either gonna start throwing shit on stage or come to these showcases with stacks of various job applications. Maybe a couple school applications too. Something to show cats that there are other things that they could be doing and striving for.”

Read Garland’s full entry here.

The Listenerd is gonna plotz

August 16, 2008

Long-time Bono hatin’ Listenerd will love this:

U2 manager Paul McGuinness, who wants file-sharers to be disconnected from the Internet, has something else to complain about today. Four songs from U2’s upcoming album ‘No Line On The Horizon’ have been leaked online after Bono played them too loudly on his stereo – and a fan recorded them.

U2 Tracks Leak After Bono Plays Stereo Too Loudly | TorrentFreak.

Saved by a meme!

May 8, 2008

T’was a looking like a slow day for me, with nary a blog entry in sight– but Caleb Dupree put some wind in my sails with a hearty meme tagging. Here are the rules:

1) Pick up the nearest book.
2) Open to page 123.
3) Find the fifth sentence.
4) Post the next three sentences.
5) Tag three people, and acknowledge who tagged you.

Thankfully, I have recently been the glad beneficiary of an Amazon giftcard, and actually have some non-library-castoff books to read. And what happened to be nearest me? John Cage’s “Silence,” perched at the edge of my desk, just near the printer… underneath the remains of my coffeecake muffin.

Page 123 yields this portion of Cage’s “Lecture on Nothing,” from 1959:

“More and more                                       I have the feeling          that we are getting
nowhere.                   Slowly                    ,                                   as the talk goes on
,                                we are getting        nowhere                       and that is a pleasure
.                            It is not irritating    to be where one is          .”

In keeping with Rule #5, I’d like to tag “Of Sound Mind,” Kingo at his newly-resurrected “Squublog,” and (because I’ve also been reading R. Murray Schafer’s “The Tuning of the World,”) I’ll tag “Bike Mike.”

John Cage Demands It!

April 27, 2008

There’s been a bit of fuss amongst WordPress bloggers about a surprise new feature added recently– the “possibly related blog posts” thing that is now dangling at the end of some of my entries. So far, it seems to be a goofy extra that mostly tries to direct readers to my own pages, which may be a sign that I’m the only person who writes about this sort of stuff!

I decided to scroll back through my entries to see if there were any useful links I would have made myself, and really didn’t find anything too mind-blowing. If anything, the whole process got me thinking about how fun it would be to have a random link generator for my own site…

Luckily, one already exists. As I gather, it was released as something of a secret, and probably as more of a curiosity than anything. Clicking on it will take you to a random Startling Moniker entry, and you’ll find it in the sidebar, titled “John Cage Demands It!”

Feel free to click the above link, or its sidebar doppelganger.

…in which our hero writes for Deputydog

April 1, 2008

Yes, it’s true– I’ve done a guest blog at Deputydog titled, “The World of Bizarre Sound Recordings.” It’s a list, so if you think I missed something, feel free to go apeshit in the comments section.

I’m trusting you all to represent yourself in a manner becoming the freaks of the music world that you surely are. Do not let me down!

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