Posts Tagged ‘art’

Koit H. Püss (1929-?)

November 17, 2015

Today, I was a library beast. I went over to Morris Library on the SIUC campus, as I have been meaning to do for some time now, and did some digging for a book of Soviet poster art I had come across back in the 90s. I’m happy to say that my elementary school library training came in handy, and I was about to locate it! Check out Morris Library’s badass Diagon Alley bookshelves, and tell me they’re not goddamn magical.

According to “The Soviet Political Poster: 1917-1980,” Koit Hansovich Püss was born in 1929, and lived the later part of his life in Moscow. In 1954, he graduated from the Estonian Art Institute in Tallinn. From the early 1950s onwards, he was active as a poster designer, graphic artist and monumental painter.

The internet is little help in finding more detail about him, so I’ve gathered pictures of the four posters I’ve learned about so far. As you can see, one of them is rather special to STARTLING MONIKER, for what would we do without our little cow mascot, Malty?

koit 1koit 2koit 3

From left to right, the posters are from 1963, 1965, and 1966. The first says “MORE!” and the last says “Children all over the world need peace.” The fourth poster says “Wait ’til I grow up!” and is from 1963. After discovering the artist’s name, I was able to find one image of it online, at Getty Images. Apparently, Getty Images thinks they can just take a picture of someone else’s art, and license it for hundreds of dollars, go fig. I think Getty can go fuck themselves, because I took my own photo of his art, and I’ll let you do whatever you want with it, at least until Mr. Püss asks us to stop.

maltymalty

 

 

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Experimental music on video Friday

August 8, 2008

I need a more catchy name for this feature, if it’s going to be a regular Friday thing… got any suggestions?

Here’s a few videos, pre-washed, and ready for consumption. The first is Sabrina Meyer, in a 2007 performance of a John Cage work. Fun use of editing, too.

Here’s the first half of Christian Marclay’s “Guitar Drag,” which I played at least a couple times on my first radio show:

This video should have been longer… the organ had some more to say.

I like Nam June Paik’s work, or what I’ve seen of it, at any rate. It’s sad that I’d never have been able to see many of his videos if it was not for services like YouTube.

Assigned reading material

July 30, 2008

Josh Ronsen’s latest issue of Monk Mink Pink Punk— this being number 15– is yet another fantastic collection of reviews and thoughts about new music for literate-minded folks. I love Ronsen’s admission about a particular Kenneth Gaburo album, “I am overjoyed that it is now easy to get: I’ve only seen the original CRI release in libraries.”

Libraries, motherfuckers!

But seriously, I encourage you to go check it out, especially the panel question feature: “What is the nature of Avant-Garde Music today (2007-2008)?” I’m throwing my lot in with Bernhard Günter’s response.

Copyright = 5 years?

July 23, 2008

Andrew Dubber, New Music Strategies blogger, has a lot of folks riled up about copyright— including me. I’d be remiss if I didn’t send some readers his way; the conversation has been fantastically interesting. His idea? Make copyright an opt-in process, with a 5-year timeout, followed by the option to renew. Dubber hopes the renewal process will lead to a greater percentage of works entering the public domain… I just think its going to result in another enormous bureaucratic clusterfuck mis-managing artists’ rights.

I found this hanging outside WDBX. Either the tree lost its pants, or someone lynched a member of Dokken.

I found this hanging outside WDBX. Either the tree lost its pants, or someone lynched a member of Dokken.

In truth, I’m still not exactly certain where I stand with copyright. It seems to me that copyright and art don’t really go together all that well anyway– art and commerce ultimately have very different goals. If I was a businessman, I could definitely understand the value in hoarding everything of any possible use forever. As an artist, I’ve often given things away for free, or at least encouraged their dissemination. Can these be reconciled?

The fear underlying most copyright decisions (or so it seems to me) is that if a big-name artist’s work wasn’t protected, it could be sold out from under their noses by unscrupulous businessmen, de-valuing their work by making it more freely and cheaply available. But hey, isn’t this already happening? As I type this, a quick torrent search reveals more than one Radiohead discography available right now. One has 33 separate albums, in lossless format, and even features scans of some booklets and liner notes!

Yet Radiohead carries on. I’ve yet to see Johnny Greenwood flipping burgers.

Granted, they might have made a lot of their money before such widespread filesharing came into practice. What about newer artists? Honestly, I have no idea. In some ways, I’m just sort of waiting to see how it plays out. My hope is that the ubiquitous availability of any sort of information, at any time, will de-value ownership itself. I know that I have downloaded songs just to avoid the walk downstairs to retrieve the actual record. I’ve downloaded albums I already own to more easily make a copy for my daughter– the de-valuation of ownership is underway.

Auto-art with Wordle

July 2, 2008

I can’t seem to leave Wordle alone, it’s just way too much fun. I have now discovered a really fun way to make automatic art with Wordle– I’m re-entering my old Wordles back into the generator!

To accomplish the process, I start with one of my prior Wordles, captured as a jpeg. For my first, I used the multi-year playlist Wordle I posted in my last entry. Then I uploaded this Wordle-become-jpeg to an ASCII art generator online, and copied the resulting mess of text. This is what I got:

Obviously, I was pleased as punch. Damn, it looks like an undiscovered John Cage score! As you may have guessed, I then decided to turn the process into a loop, capturing this Wordle as a jpeg and re-upping it to the ASCII art generator. Then– back into the Wordle generator! Here are the next four generations of my auto-art, which Wordle creator Jonathan Feinberg, has pronounced “insane.” Given his obvious love of typefaces, I think that’s a compliment.

You’ll definitely want to click these for the full-size versions.

Liveblogging! Commentary for “ITDE” 12/8/07

December 8, 2007

Update: The download for this broadcast is now available. As always, I implore you to turn from your churlish ways– please visit the linked musicians and labels in the playlist below– and most importantly, support those you enjoy by purchasing their albums. Feel free to name-drop your favorite DJ when placing your order. I can’t guarantee you a 75% discount on your bill, but philosophers assure me that things can’t be proven not to exist, either.

I don’t have a lot to say this week, so I’m leaving the commentary rather sparse. Earlier, I answered the phone: “Yes, your radio is broken, whaddya want?” so you can see how it’s going around here. On the upside, I might have turned someone on to the Last Visible Dog label with the Vapaa disc– and that’s always a good thing.

Had to play a little Stockhausen on today’s show, obviously… gets me thinking about the media term “gatekeepers,” and how difficult it must have been to hear someone like Stockhausen when he was younger. I imagine if you weren’t in a major city, you probably couldn’t even order one of his recordings, could you? It’s a wonderful world in some ways now– it’s going to be very interesting to see how the simple availability of materials such as these affect our collective appreciation and understanding of the greater “whole” of art.

Some new stuff arrived from Lona Records yesterday. I had to check out the Maurizio Bianchi album “Zyklusters” first. I’m really digging it, but I’m not certain the description on the back isn’t a put-on, at least not without a dictionary. If anyone is “seeking the tumorigenic antithesis of the embryonal context in the dissonant framework,” please stand up.

I keep promising to write reviews, and I keep being a chump about following through. Can I call a truce? I’m tired out! My next review will definitely be Charlie J. Moneybags’ “An Evening With…” disc, even though it may not be a proper release. I don’t care. I have things to say about it, but I also have a lot of dishes to do. Surely, you can see the problem: Dishwater + Keyboard = Electrical hazard

Hot damn. George Korein/Naked Mall Rats is so much fun to listen to. Gotta love the track “I Just Wanna Pwn You,” with all the variations on how to pronounce “pwn,” lol. Speaking of things I can’t pronounce– “Phon°noir,” anyone? Seriously, folks… why do you do this to me? Between the Finnish, the pseudo-electronic IDM track titles, and the ASCII symbols; you’re killing me.

You can type degree symbols at home, though, and be just like your favorite experimental music blogger: activate your number lock button, hold down ALT, and type “167” on your number pad. º, easy!

Garth Kunkle — Shake it Like Jello and Make it Say Hello
Metis Yeti — Verdun Massacre
Hong Chulki — Without Cartridge 1
Mike Hallenbeck — Eventualities 01.1: Voice
Mike Hallenbeck — Shuffletronics #1: A Beginning, A Middle, And an End
MurmurDiscovery of Mother Voidness
Vapaa — Varjoista
Muck — On Any Given Day The Inspection From Within
Karlheinz Stockhausen — Kontra-Punkte Op. 1, For 10 Instruments
Maurizio Bianchi — Zyklusters
Charlie J. Moneybags — Hope
Naked Mall Rats — There Must Be Somewhere
Naked Mall Rats — I Just Wanna Pwn You
Naked Mall Rats — Moved By Your Emoticon
Naked Mall Rats — Stop Trolling My Life
Phon°noir — Embryo
Phon°noir — From Time to Time We Change Our Minds
Phon°noir — Airplane Traces in the Sky
Phon°noir — No More Sad Dreams
Ernesto Diaz-Infante — 1:04
Ernesto Diaz-Infante — from Henry who just wrote
Ernesto Diaz-Infante — 1:03
Ernesto Diaz-Infante — :57
Ernesto Diaz-Infante — 1:05
Ernesto Diaz-Infante — 1:02
Ernesto Diaz-Infante — 3:08 Cranking up it’s pathos
Ernesto Diaz-Infante — 1:02
Ernesto Diaz-Infante — 1:03
Ernesto Diaz-Infante — 1:05